The Stigma of Seeing a Therapist

Today I shall be seeing a therapist for the first time ever. I say that statement without shame and without worry. Sadly, there seems to be a stigma with admitting that one sees or will be seeing a therapist. Honestly, I don’t see why.

If a friend came up to you and said, “I think I might be having some blood pressure issues, I am going to make an appointment to check it out”, you would probably commend that friend on taking care of their physical health and seeking treatment.

I believe the same support should be given to those who seek assistance for their mental health. A person does not have to have a mental disability or a personal, catastrophic tragedy to seek out the assistance of a mental health professional. With the varying types of mental health professionals there are varying degrees of need for such support.

The stigma of seeing a therapist comes in when people start making assumptions and judgements. People assume that you might be “crazy” or have a mental illness. People assume that you are having some catastrophic personal crisis. People assume that only “weak” people need to see therapists. After those assumptions are made, then people start to judge.

I, personally, am seeking therapy for how I am managing stress. I’ve written about it already… My hands are absolutely full house hunting, wedding planning, working, and trying to manage my personal relationships. I have noticed that in the last 4 weeks or so I am not managing my stress in any manner that is considered healthy. My sleep is suffering. My emotions are on the worst imaginable rollercoaster. My fiance and I are not communicating as well as we usually do.  I become upset much more rapidly than normal. I feel as if I am not understood by those around me.

I know that with everything on my plate right now, and the negative way I am handling the stress, that this is a prime opportunity for me to speak to someone about how I am managing everything. Sometimes, you need to hear things from a neutral third-party. Sometimes, a person can give you some insight into your personality and your interactions with others that you may not have noticed.

There is nothing wrong with a bit of mental health self-improvement. We do self-improvement in SO many aspects of our lives. Work, physical health, financial, etc… Trying to become mentally healthier only helps to improve us as people overall. What we can learn can help provide a positive affect on the rest of our lives.

So today, I shall go into my first therapy session with my head held high. I don’t care about any assumptions or judgements made against me. I know that I am going to be doing something positive. It is time for a little “me” time…

Advertisements

We welcome comments and look forward to interacting with our followers!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s